2018 Meetings

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Civil War Trivia

6.30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

+ Event Details

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Civil War Trivia

LeAnn Krokker and John Urschel


Please join us for a fun filled evening of Civil War Trivia with LeAnn Krokker and John Urschel. 


6.30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

"Faith of the Fathers" - the Courage, Humor and Dedication of Catholic Civil War Chaplains

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

+ Event Details

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

"Faith of the Fathers" - the Courage, Humor and Dedication of Catholic Civil War Chaplains

Father Robert J. Miller

 

The 100+ Catholic priests who served as chaplains in the Civil War were NOT your “usual” priests & bishops - there was nothing boring about them!  They were a unique group of “priest pioneers”: adventuresome, courageous, outspoken, ground-breakers & apologists as well as Catholic churchmen in “foreign land”. This presentation focuses on the role of these Catholic chaplains in the War, their numbers, impact and some stories of some colorful and interesting “characters” among them.


Being an antebellum Catholic was not an easy task, due to lack of priests as Catholic immigrants flooded the country, a strong anti-Catholic culture, and a Vatican that didn’t “get” American democracy.  We will put flesh on the long-ignored topic of religion in the war, and introduce a group of Catholic clergymen who changed the country and became “legends” because of their service – Corby, Cooney, Sheeran, the Jesuits, Irish Catholics and many more.


​​Robert J. Miller, is Pastor at St Dorothy Church (Chicago); Adjunct Professor of Ecclesiology, Archdiocese of Chicago; and author of "Both Prayed to the Same God: Religion and Faith in the American Civil War”.

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Potawatomi Soldiers in the Civil War – A Lost Chapter in Michigan’s Civil War History!

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

+ Event Details

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Potawatomi Soldiers in the Civil War – A Lost Chapter in Michigan’s Civil War History!

Lansing Historian & Author, Mr. Chris Czopek 


In 1840 the US Army came to Michigan for the purpose of rounding up the Potawatomi Indians and sending them west to Kansas.  The polite name for this action was “The Potawatomi Removal”.  A more accurate name would be “The Trail of Death”.  The soldiers wore blue uniforms and use rifles with bayonets to “persuade” the reluctant captives to move forward.  24 years later, the Civil War was not going well for the North.  In order to win the war, they needed fresh troops.  But where to find them?  In desperation, they sent recruiters to the Indian tribes in Michigan, to invite them to enlist.  Not all of the Potawatomi were gone. Many had evaded the removal of 1840, and now their young men were being asked to put on a blue uniform, carry a rifle and bayonet, and fight to save the US Government.  Would any of them, do it?


On Tuesday, March 13, this question will be answered!  A real-life History Detective is coming to St. Joseph to meet with the Civil War Round Table of Southwest Michigan. He has chosen this occasion to tell, for the FIRST TIME IN PUBLIC, the story of Potawatomi Indians who volunteered to be sharpshooters in the army of General Grant.  You will not find this information on the internet!  It is not in any book in your library!  The only way to lean this story is to attend the March 13 meeting of the Civil War Round Table of Southwest Michigan. The time is 6:30 pm.  The Place is the Fellowship Hall (lower level) of the First Congregational Church at 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, MI.  Admission is free for members or students.  Non-member admission is $5.00.  The stories are unforgettable!  One tale is called the Lost Papoose, about a baby left behind by accident when soldiers rounded up a village and marched them way. Another tale is called The Great Escape, the story of a band that broke away from the Trail of Death and returned to Michigan.  There is also a story of a soldier who shook the hand of Abraham Lincoln.  Another soldier was the son of a Potawatomi Chief who was wounded in action and ended up a resident at Michigan’s Old Soldier’s Home.  If you enjoy Civil War history, you will not want to miss this program! If you have an interest in Native American history, you too will want to see this program!


The speaker is Lansing historian Chris Czopek.  Chris is the author of “Who Was Who in Company K”, the first and only book written about Michigan’s all-Indian Sharpshooters unit.  After the program, there will be a book signing.  Bring your checkbook and take home an autographed copy of his unique book!


​​Chris grew up in Michigan during the Civil War Centennial. As a boy, he would watch a Civil War movie on TV – then go to the library and find out how much of the story was true. This was the beginning of his career as a “history detective”.


After college, he worked for a newspaper, joined the army and served six years in Military Intelligence, volunteered for an archaeological dig in Israel, worked as a tour guide at the State Capitol Building in Lansing, a photographer for the State Senate, and a criminal records manager in the offices of the Michigan State Police.  He lives in Lansing with his wife, Bonnie.


In recent years Chris has become well known to Michigan historians for his expert research of Civil War soldiers. Called “Lansing’s History Detective” by the Lansing State Journal, he has published several books on Civil War history and has been a consultant for The History Channel. Chris is best known as the author of Who Was Who in Company K, the first book to give solid facts about Michigan’s Native American men who served in the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters.  He is currently involved in projects that will bring the role of Native American soldiers in the Civil War to public attention. He takes great pride in his contribution to the award-winning documentary film Road to Andersonville

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Camp Douglas - Chicago's Forgotten Civil War Prison

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

+ Event Details

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Camp Douglas - Chicago's Forgotten Civil War Prison

Author and Founder of the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation, Mr. David Keller


Opened in 1861, Camp Douglas was a Union training and reception facility for over 40,000 Union soldiers in Chicago.  Camp Douglas became a prison camp, housing over 30,000 Confederate prisoners, from 1862 until it was demolished in 1865.  Containing over 200 buildings on 60 acres, Camp Douglas was the most significant Civil War facility in Northern Illinois.


David Keller is a long-time resident of Chicago and an amateur historian.  Mr. Keller’s professional life included various executive positions at Chicago area commercial banks.  Currently he is a respected expert witness in banking matters throughout the country.  Retired since 2002, he devotes much of his time to volunteer activities including the Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago History Museum and the American Youth Soccer Organization.  David’s interest in Camp Douglas comes from his interest in the Civil War, Civil War Prison Camps and 19th century Chicago history.  As the founder of the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation, Mr. Keller is in demand as a speaker on the Civil War and Camp Douglas and has written two books, The Story of Camp Douglas, Chicago’s Forgotten Civil War Prison and Robert Anderson Bagby, Civil War Diary (Annotated) 1863-1865.


David Keller, using, Civil War photos, PowerPoint®, and a display of information and artifacts, will provide a presentation of the history of Camp Douglas and Camp Douglas stories from diaries and journals of Confederate prisoners of the Camp.  The presentation will include information on conditions and loss of life at the camp, current status of the camp’s site, and work done by the Camp Douglas Restoration Foundation to provide a lasting remembrance of Camp Douglas.​

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Round Table Discussion of the Petersburg Campaign

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

+ Event Details

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Round Table Discussion of the Petersburg Campaign

Mike Dumke, Dennis Rasbach, Ted Chamberlain & Scott Adrian


The May meeting will be an open discussion by the members of the round table of the Petersburg Campaign.  The meeting will be moderated by Mike Dumke, Dennis Rasbach - Author of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the Petersburg Campaign, Ted Chamberlain & Scott Adrian. The discussion will include the various aspects of the Campaign including troop movements, personalities, battles, terrain and the significance of the various engagements. 

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

More Events