2020 Meetings

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Faye and Ted Chamberlain, “Why We Do Living History.”

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Event Details

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Faye and Ted Chamberlain, “Why We Do Living History.”

Ted & Faye Chamberlain

  

Living historians, Faye and Ted Chamberlain, are often asked why they spend so much time and money portraying General Joshua and Mrs. Fanny Chamberlain. The answer (besides the obvious answer of being related) is quite simple.  With stories, photographs, and videos, they will regale you with their experiences over the last twenty years. 


Faye and Ted Chamberlain are natives of opposite coasts of the United States, Faye from Eastern Pennsylvania and Ted from Western Oregon. However, only one year into their marriage, in 1967, they moved to the Midwest and, except for a ten year sojourn in California, have made Michigan their home for most of

their 52 years of life together. They received their bachelors degrees in Maryland (while Ted was serving in the military at Walter Reed Army Medical Center), their masters degrees in

Michigan and California, and Ted completed his doctoral degree at the Claremont School of Theology in California. Both have been university professors and, more recently, business people. Faye is a member of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, while Ted is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. He is a founder of the World Chamberlain Genealogical Society. For over 20 years, Ted has indulged his lifetime love of American history by portraying his cousin, Civil War hero General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (His career has closely followed that of his illustrious cousin: soldier, clergyman, professor, and businessman). Faye has recently joined him with her portrayal of the general's wife, Francis (Fanny) Caroline Adams. When not traveling to Civil War venues they spend their time in St. Joseph, Michigan, where Faye serves on the board of the Twin Cities Organ Concert Series and Ted has, for many years, been a member and officer of the board of the Berrien County Historical Association. They have recently participated in founding the Civil War Round Table of Southwest Michigan.

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Beyond Nightingale & Barton: How Civil War Relief Work Launched the Nursing Profession

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Event Details

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Beyond Nightingale & Barton: How Civil War Relief Work Launched the Nursing Profession

Professor Jane Schultz


 “Beyond Nightingale and Barton” assesses the impact of civilian relief work during the Civil War--work that was performed primarily by women and which led to the postwar professionalization of nursing. This work puts to rest the mythology of war workers as “ministering angels” by examining the racial, class, religious, and gender demographics of more than 20,000 women who took care of fallen soldiers as nurses, cooks, and laundresses.  I zero in on hospital workers’ interactions with surgeons, which figure prominently in their accounts of war work.  Although the majority of workers desired anonymity in the 1860's, many came to see their hospital work as symbolically equivalent to that of veterans by the 1880's and successfully agitated for nursing pensions in the 1890's.


 Jane E. Schultz is Professor of English, History, and Medical Humanities at the large urban campus of Indiana Univ. in Indianapolis. A scholar of Civil War nursing and medicine, she published Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America (U of North Carolina) in 2004—a finalist for the Lincoln Prize—and This Birth Place of Souls (Oxford UP), the diary of a New England field nurse, in 2011. She is currently at work on two Civil War era books: the first, Lead, Blood, and Ink, is a study of wartime surgical culture; and the second, A Match Made in Hospital, concerns the alliances forged in military hospitals when diverse populations came together in them. In addition to co-editing the Manchester University Press book series on Nursing History and Humanities, Schultz has written widely on cancer memoirs and is the Board President of the Indiana Medical History Museum in Indianapolis—one of only two remaining 19th-century surgical amphitheaters in the US.  

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

The 22nd Michigan Infantry and the Road to Chickamauga

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Event Details

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

The 22nd Michigan Infantry and the Road to Chickamauga

Author John Cohassey

  

Called upon to take a hill at the 1863 Battle of Chickamauga, the 22nd Michigan Infantry—untested in combat—fought valiantly, helping to save the Union left flank commanded by General George H. Thomas. Farm boys, shopkeepers, school teachers and lawyers, these volunteers from the Great Lakes region formed one of many units that answered the call for the Union’s preservation.

  

From its formation in 1862 to its last train ride home, the 22nd confronted slavery and African-American runaways in the border state of Kentucky and encountered near starvation during the siege of Chattanooga. It helped to build bridges and buildings and marched to Atlanta as General Thomas’ provost guard.


Cohassey will speak about the 22nd’s day-to-day experiences in Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia--the struggles to supply and feed the volunteer unit, while facing death during battle and disease in camp and in Confederate prisons. 


John Cohassey earned a master's degree in history from Wayne State University (1995). Trained in the visual arts, he played music professionally for many years before becoming a freelance writer, contributing articles to periodicals like The Detroit News, and over fifty entries of African-American music and culture for Gale Research Inc. His first book, Toast of the Town the Life and Times of Sunnie Wilson (Wayne State Press, 1998), won an award of merit from the Historical Society of Michigan. In 2007 Cohassey served as a consultant for the History Channel documentary Hippes.  

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Clever and Unusual Escapes from Slavery

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Event Details

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Clever and Unusual Escapes from Slavery

Millie Henley


Desperate enslaved people of the pre-Civil War South devised all kinds of ways to escape from bondage. Some of their methods were quite ingenious. From hiding in plain sight, to disguises, to piloting a ship under Confederate guns, brave people on the run used all their daring and ingenuity to make a better life. Hear their stirring stories when Millie Henley of Historical Connections presents Clever and Unusual Escapes from Slavery.  She will wear period attire and use Power Point illustrations to bring the inspiring stories to life.


Millie Henley has a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois and a Master’s Degree from Kent State University. She was a professional librarian for 25 years and is an avid lifelong student of history, spending months researching each presentation. She travels to historic reenactments of the 18th and 19th Centuries and delights in historic dancing. Her great joy is to share her passion for history with audiences who may not have known how intriguing it is.

 

Millie agrees with Ken Burns when he says that the most engaging way to learn history is through stories. Finding out about individuals, what they experienced, what decisions they made, and what actions they took allows emotional engagement with the past that draws you in. Empathy and understanding kick in and that causes one to find out more information. Stories create a connection for us to the past that no other method can. We still need data and trends, but engaging with people of the past deepens the experience and gives it meaning. I have seen many people gravitate to history because true stories were their introduction to the subject. Stories of history brought me in, too.


In my Historical Connections presentations about the 18th and 19th Centuries I try to humanize events and allow the audience to feel connected with people who came before. History really is OUR story. We are links in the long line marching from the past to the future. It really is about us, too. And if we don’t know our past, we can’t really know who we are. As Michael Crichton said, “If you don’t know history . . . you are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree.”


Millie has presented at historical societies, Civil War Round Tables, historical reenactments, an adult education organization, historical sites, libraries, and special events, including U.S. Grant Days in Georgetown, OH and Heritage Village Civil War Days in Cincinnati, OH.

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Round Table Discussion of the Battles of Chickamauga and Chattanooga

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

Event Details

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Round Table Discussion of the Battles of Chickamauga and Chattanooga

 

Mike Dumke, Ted Chamberlain & Scott Adrian


The June meeting will be an open discussion by the members of the round table of the Battles of Chickamauga & Chattanooga.  The meeting will be moderated by Mike Dumke, Ted Chamberlain & Scott Adrian. The discussion will include the various aspects of the battles including troop movements, personalities, battles, terrain and the significance of both battles.

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

First Congregational Church, Fellowship Hall (lower level) 2001 Niles Ave., St. Joseph, Michigan

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